68 million users affected - Yes, It’s True, Your Dropbox Account Has Been Hacked By Some Bad Guys

I know people who upload everything to Dropbox. Like in… everything. Not just work or school stuff like documents, notes, and inspirational images, nope, the cloud is the new must-have…
68 million users affected

Yes, It’s True, Your Dropbox Account Has Been Hacked By Some Bad Guys

I know people who upload everything to Dropbox. Like in… everything. Not just work or school stuff like documents, notes, and inspirational images, nope, the cloud is the new must-have backup solution, because someone could steal or burn your laptop whenever he wants, so they upload their music files, their ripped movies, and even the nudes of their girlfriends to Dropbox.

Problem is, though: That’s not a safe thing to do. It’s convenient, yes, and it’s probably the future, also yes, but there are many people out there who want to see your music files, your ripped movies, and, yes, even the nudes of your girlfriend. And whatever personal stuff you’ve decided to put into that cute digital box. There’s the NSA. There are nosy employees. And there are hackers.

Motherboard just revealed that 68,680,741 Dropbox accounts have been hacked in 2012. “Motherboard obtained a selection of files containing email addresses and hashed passwords for the Dropbox users through sources in the database trading community,” Joseph Cox writes. “In all, the four files total in at around 5GB, and contain details on 68,680,741 accounts. The data is legitimate, according to a senior Dropbox employee who was not authorized to speak on the record.”

Although the accounts were stolen during a previously disclosed breach, and Dropbox says it has already forced password resets, this message should still be a warning message for people who naively upload everything into the cloud, just because they think the cloud is some impalpable wonder above us. It’s not. The cloud consists of real servers. And real servers can be hacked.

“There is no doubt whatsoever that the data breach contains legitimate Dropbox passwords, you simply can’t fabricate this sort of thing,” technology and security expert Troy Hunt writes. “There are now 68,648,009 Dropbox accounts searchable in Have I Been Pwned?. I’ve also just sent 144,136 emails to subscribers of the free notification service and a further 8,476 emails to those using the free domain monitoring service. Definitely still change your password if you’re in any doubt whatsoever and make sure you enable Dropbox’s two-step verification while you’re there if it’s not on already.” Yes, yes you should do that. Now!

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1 Comment

  • Mirco

    That hack was 4 years ago. So changing your password now, is a neat idea, but maybe you should have done this much earlier.

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